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Dominant Male - Jan 30th 2009 @ 09:30AM
by Matt Stone
There was once a young buck that lived a carefree life; a dominant male, what we would call “the man” in our neck of the woods.  He had a scrape line that ran from one end of the county to the other. Then one day, he happened to see this particular doe that really caught his eye; after that he had no need for his scrape line anymore.

In a short while they had their first fawn, a little doe; then came a little nubbin head buck and then another little doe.  Life went on as usual in the woods.  Then before he knew it, he was no longer a young buck, but had grown into a fully mature buck.  In the process, his fawns had grown into yearlings.  As each generation matures, there is always a changing of the guard. 

The mature buck was at the top of his game and had no intentions of yielding to any subordinate bucks that might be hiding in the bushes.  At first all it took was just a stern stare to scatter the younger bucks.  If that didn’t work, then a grunt or the threat of locking horns surely sent any lesser buck into the next county. 

Then the inevitable happened.  His own doe yearlings began to glance back at the young bucks; to him it seemed as if they almost encouraged it.  And then one day, it finally happened; a young buck stood in "the man's" home territory.  The confrontation was imminent; tension was in the air, and the only calm one in the wood was his doe of many seasons.  Just one glance from her, and he knew he had better rethink his position. 

Just about that time, my oldest daughter, Kelly, came over and gave me a big hug and assured me that I’d always be “the man,” and then left with her date to the prom.  She was beautiful standing there; a young lady standing at the threshold of becoming a woman herself.  As I remembered back, I thought about the time I had taken my doe to the prom.  I guess it’s just the natural progression of life.  Young bucks step up and old bucks just fade away.  Isn’t it amazing what we can learn from our friends we share the land with?

Naturally Yours,

Matt Stone
Articles
2009
      July
           Natural Regeneration
           Natural Instint
           Stewardship
           Spelunking
           THANK YOU
           WORDS
      March
           Ancillary Benefits
      January
           The Thinker
           The Game Plan
           Potential
           Natural Man
           My Shadow
           Mossy State of Mind
           Life Style
           Land
           Gobblers
           Feral Hogs
           Emerald Sea
           Dominant Male
           Buying Made Simple
           Becoming One
           Around The Bend
           Already Gone
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